Thursday, August 11 2022
Harmon Wilfred and his wife Carolyn Dare-Wilfred, photographed in 2005 while fighting a deportation order against Wilfred, born in the United States.

Dean Kozanic/Things

Harmon Wilfred and his wife Carolyn Dare-Wilfred, photographed in 2005 while fighting a deportation order against Wilfred, born in the United States.

A Canadian heiress connected to a baked goods and confectionery empire is facing bankruptcy in New Zealand from failed business ventures.

Carolyn Ruth Dare-Wilfred owns a third of the shares in Kitchener-based Dare Foods, 100 kilometers west of Toronto. The company employs 1,200 people across North America and bills about $500 million a year. It values ​​its shares at more than $50 million.

Dare-Wilfred married American Harmon Wilfred in 1998 and they came to New Zealand in 2001 to settle in Christchurch.

Harmon Wilfred, now one of New Zealand’s longest stayers, gave up his US citizenship in 2005 over alimony payments and other issues. He expects to be jailed upon his return to the United States and claims that the CIA is after him for exposing a massive CIA fraud.

READ MORE:
* ‘Legally they don’t exist’: New Zealand’s stateless population of two
* Bankrupt American Harmon Wilfred challenges deportation order

Carolyn Dare-Wilfred and Harmon Wilfred with the poodle Jessie at their Christchurch home in 2008.

David Alexander/Things

Carolyn Dare-Wilfred and Harmon Wilfred with the poodle Jessie at their Christchurch home in 2008.

Wilfred, now 73, set up several businesses in Christchurch, but several failed and he filed for bankruptcy in 2016.

The couple’s latest difficulties are playing out in Christchurch High Court, where Heartland Bank wants to take Dare-Wilfred into bankruptcy over a $1,164,125 debt related to a drinks business in New Zealand.

In June, the bank went to court for instructions on how it should serve the bankruptcy notice on Dare-Wilfred, who returned to Canada in 2015 after his business visa ran out.

Harmon Wilfred and Carolyn Dare-Wilfred settled in Christchurch in 2001. Dare-Wilfred has since returned to Canada.

Dean Kozanic/Things

Harmon Wilfred and Carolyn Dare-Wilfred settled in Christchurch in 2001. Dare-Wilfred has since returned to Canada.

One of the instructions was to deliver the notice to Wilfred so he could alert his wife. However, Harmon Wilfred could not be found, and in July, in the latest court decision, the High Court said that sending notice to Wilfred’s email address would suffice.

The couple’s business, which operated as La Famia Function Center at Wigram Manor, was put into liquidation in 2013 due to the Inland Revenue nearly $300,000 and to general creditors $246,000. The Labor Relations Authority awarded several members of the functional center staff some $60,000 for breach of employment obligations.

Wilfred claims to have been a CIA contractor who was hunted down and threatened with death after exposing a major CIA fraud. New Zealand Immigration says he is in New Zealand illegally, but has nowhere to send him.

Upon his return to Canada, Dare-Wilfred took legal action against his two brothers, who work in the family business, to force them to buy his shares. She said that she could not sell the shares elsewhere and that her brothers were in effect holding her shares hostage. The Toronto Superior Court rejected her claim.

Dare Foods began in Kitchener in 1889 when Charles Doerr started baking cookies in the back of his neighborhood grocery store. Doerr’s grandson, Carl Dare (Dare-Wilfred’s father), took over the business in the early 1940s. He died at age 96 in 2014.

Sold in 50 countries around the world, Dare Foods products include Breton cookies, Bear Paws cookies, Wagon Wheels snacks and a variety of candies.

Previous

Deborah Rennard played Sly Lovegren in "Dallas." See her now at 62.

Next

Is Dwayne Johnson planning to buy WWE soon? - The UBJ

Check Also